How has courting changed throughout the years?

Spring fever, anyone? Before you start running around searching for dates, read this week’s edition of WikiAnswers Wednesday to understand how the courting process has evolved.

How has courting changed throughout the years?

Actually, except for a few minor details, it hasn’t. Note the following:

Exhibit A: Neanderthal Age

Boy meets girl. Boy grunts. Girl rolls her eyes. Boy clubs the girl. Girl wakes up next to boy.

Exhibit B: Bible Age

Boy is hungry. Boy realizes he has a few extra camels. Boy goes to girl’s father and sells him a couple. Girl wakes up next to boy, holding a pot and some lentils.

Exhibit C: Shakespearean Age

Boy falls in love with the beauty of an unattainable girl. Girl falls in love with the words of an unattainable boy. Fighting ensues. Girl wakes up next to dead boy.

Exhibit D: Modern Age

Boy puts on his best silk shirt and gels his hair. Girl wears a lot of makeup and butt-hugging jeans. Dancing ensues. Girl wakes up next to boy, shrugs, and goes to work.


On cheese, apostrophes and car chargers.

Pools. Cheese. Martial arts. The curiosity never ends, folks, so neither does my job. Here is what bloggers have been learning lately:

Aaaaaaaaaaaaa-CHOO!

Wow. Allergy season is upon us and I know that for me, this has been one of the worst hayfever seasons ever. I’ve been sneezing and itchy-eyed for what seems like months now. I should buy stock in Kleenex considering the amount of their lotion tissue I’ve used lately. I mean really…who can use tissue without lotion!? The little extra money you pay for the lotiony softness is so worth it.

I think I’m pretty lucky in the scheme of things though. Why? Well, because I’m only allergic to trees and grass…and dust…and cats. There are some people who are allergic to milk or wheat or sunshine. My life would be over if I had to stop drinking milkshakes or eating pizza or sitting on the beach. Period. I mean…I live in a beach town, folks. There are only but so many things you can request from a girl!

Anyway, back to me…and my allergies…I’ve basically learned to live with it. I just avoid cats at all costs (read “I give them evil looks when they try to come near me”) and carry tissues with me during the pollen-rich months of the Spring. It’s manageable.

Stop sneezing! Put away the dust masks! In the spirit of the season, WikiAnswers challenges you…ok I challenge you…to ask and answer questions about allergies!

achoo!

So what are all the answers?

I was walking with a group of friends in my town the other day, one of whom was wearing the signature Answers.com t-shirt.

Answers.com t shirt front

(t-shirt front)

Answers.com t-shirt back

(t-shirt back)

As we walked, two kids rode by us on bicycles, the boy calling out: “So, what are all the answers???”

What I said out loud was, “Go to http://www.answers.com!”

But what I thought to myself was, You could start by wearing a helmet…

Answers are everywhere… Are you looking right?

It’s been a bit longer than I usually wait for the WikiAnswers/Answers.com blogger round-up, so this is going to be a ginormous list.

Remember, folks: answers are everywhere – on the web, in your photo albums, between the seat cushions – you just have to keep looking till you find them.

Or, to make it easier, go to www.answers.com or http://wiki.answers.com.

And now for the list:

In parts of Texas and Oklahoma, pinochle refers not to a card game but to the manly sport of thumb wrestling. One speculative explanation: It could be “related to the words pin and knuckle, describing the object of the game: using one’s thumb to `pin’ the other’s knuckle.”

How many Oreos would it take to reach the moon?

Sometimes I think we need to focus on the questions and not the answers. I mean, really really look deep into the words that make up these questions. Stare these questions in the face and dare them to be less than spectacular.

And then there are questions that need to be examined from the point of view of the asker: Is this what the asker really wanted to know? Or is there more?

And then there are questions that really only want you to sit back, chuckle, and then fall asleep before coming up with the right answer:

How many Oreos would it take to reach the moon?

There is actually an equation if you click on that link. But there’s no reason to get all philosophical. I’m too distracted by craving Oreos.

How do you play a trick on your girlfriend?

Hmm… Is this question meant for a practical answer or is it just asked for the sake of hutzpah? Because I can guarantee that as good as you think the trick will be, it will not pay off.

Do imponderables like lizards and lollipops?

I’m not completely sure what this question means, but I like the sound of it. Do imponderables like lizards and lollipops?

Happy Earth Day to you…

Earth DayHappy Earth Day to you! And to me! …and to all the inhabitants of our lovely planet. In celebration of this special day, WikiAnswers encourages you to ask and answer questions about the environment.

What is everyone else wondering about? Well…

Haven’t YOU always wondered how plants detect their level of gravity? It’s a question that’s plagued me for years.

And what I’ve ALWAYS wanted to know…how far north can palm trees be grown? I’ve been thinking about planting some on my ranch in Alaska…

Answers.com is a Cnet Webware winner!

Webware badge

Answers.com made it to the Top 100 Webware sites awarded the honor of being a “cool Web 2.0 app for everyone.”

On behalf of Answers.com, I’d like to thank God, the Academy and my dear mother. Without all her encouragement to “push the interwebs as far as they go, honey, and don’t forget to write me an tmail dmail email about how to use the fax machine,” I don’t think Answers.com would be the world’s greatest encyclodictionalmanacapedia it is today.

We’re the cool kids…

Cool site of the dayWe’ve all wanted it. We’ve envied them from afar. We’ve secretly plotted to steal their cute clothes and their fancy cars. Everyone wants to be a cool kid. Or was that just me?

Nah…you know you wanted to be a cool kid.

Well today…WikiAnswers is the cool kid. We’ve been chosen by the folks at Cool Site of the Day to be…well…the cool site of the day!

What does it all mean? Well it means that folks out there think we’re pretty darn cool. They’ve featured a new site every single day since 1994 and today, they chose us. Thanks for the recognition, guys!

Now all of you WikiAnswers fanatics…get out there and vote for us. (That link will only work today…April 16, 2008 so hurry up and click it!)

Slam the Boards, WikiAnswers style.

IT Nitwit, blogger at… well, Confessions of an IT Nitwit, discusses an online tradition of librarians from all over: Slam the Boards!

These are no ordinary librarians: They call themselves the Answer Board Librarians, participate in their own wiki and describe their project as the following:

“This is an idea-sharing wiki for librarians who post to answer boards, like Answers.com’s WikiAnswers, Yahoo Answers or Amazon’s Askville. We recognize that these sites can help promote the idea that librarians are active and dynamic participants in the web 2.0 community, and we’re not just waiting for the questions to come in!”

Anyway, IT Nitwit has come to the following conclusion, with which I couldn’t agree more:

“On the basis of a fairly brief look in Yahoo! Answers much of the material is rubbish – the questions are insincere and the answers aren’t much better. Perhaps the fact that I looked under the Environment and Health categories skewed the results. Most questions in Environment were more platforms for expressing an opinion.

WikiAnswers had a much higher standard of questions and answers.”

HealthPricer Post proves this point with a comparison done between Yahoo Answers and WikiAnswers. Check out the major difference in the quality and maturity of the answers given.

Of course, there is a lot of work to be done on WikiAnswers, but after finding that the site was the fastest growing U.S. site in 2007 – well, it shouldn’t be too far along from world domination…

How do you pierce your own anti-eyebrow?

As I’ve mentioned, I am the WikiAnswers Supervisor for the colorful category of Body Piercing. This week’s question will be from that category, my favorite:

How do you pierce your own anti-eyebrow?

Now, you might be like, “what the duce is an anti-eyebrow?” and think that’s what I’m going for here. Is it some kind of inverse eyebrow? A unibrow? A rebellious teenage eyebrow?

Watch out, everyone! It’s the anti-eyebrow! Ahh! Hide your 666′s!

Well, folks: no. The anti-eyebrow is actually a type of body piercing. It’s a barbell placed between the cheek bone and eyebrow, creating a kind of teardrop look.

The stupid part of this question is the part asking about it doing it yourself. Do-it-yourself piercings are never a good idea. A professional has the right equipment and experience to get it right and get it healthy.

P.S.: Did you know that the medical term for unibrow is actually synophrys? It sounds sooo much more attractive that way, too.

Nearing 3,000 categories on WikiAnswers.

Part of this What’s New on WikiAnswers page is the list of the latest category additions. I love skimming this list every so often because it reveals the wonderful, wacky and wild topics that WikiAnswers community members are interested in.

Currently, the homepage boasts “2,841 community-grown Q&A collections.” That number is constantly climbing, though, as evidenced by the latest additions list mentioned above.

For instance: Rats of NIMH. First of all, I loved the movie as a kid. Brilliant story. Second of all, it’s actually a category on WikiAnswers! Whether the people asking are kids, students, bookworms or nostalgic old timers like me, there is a population out there demanding answers, and here is a Q&A community giving just that.

Other new categories include Fashion Design, Yahoo Mail, Paganism, and Microsoft Word. That might be a random list, but hey, who is going to argue with curious people looking for answers?

Liars, torture, teeth… and Hillary Clinton.

And here we go, once again: a round-up of the latest WikiAnswers questions being asked by bloggers. One of my favorite parts of the week, considering how much new (and, yes, sometimes useless) info that I pick up.

It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s… Librarian of the Internet!

Answers.com – as we all know, the world’s greatest encyclodictionalmanacapedia – was discovered and listed by findingDulcinea, “Librarian of the Internet,” and posted in the Up & Running section of their Netcetera links section:

An “online dictionary, encyclopedia, and much more,” Answers combines resources like Wikipedia, the All Music Guide, and the Free Dictionary to bring you the most comprehensive collection of information on thousands of people, places, and things.

In case the name doesn’t ring a bell:

Dulcinea Media, Inc. is a Silicon Alley team of savvy Internet users. Our mission is to untangle the Web, freeing it of clutter and spotlighting only the sites that matter. We aim to provide a richer experience for every Internet user.

Aw shucks, guys.

How do you use toilet paper?

For some, the bathroom is the holiest room of the house. For others, it is most definitely not. Whichever way you lean, the fact is, the bathroom is pretty darn important. So here is one of the most important WikiAnswers Wednesday questions you will ever read:

How do you use toilet paper?

Rather than go into the – um – dirty details, I’d like to briefly explain where I got the inspiration for highlighting this question. And by briefly, I mean, I got it in… the bathroom. At the Answers Headquarters. Because it is hanging there. The question is hanging there, to be read and understood as you… well, yeah.

Don’t believe me?

How do you use toilet paper?

My favorite part about it is the commentary that someone had a thought while reading it and penciled in: “Why is this question categorized in the Health category? RECATEGORIZE!”

Celebrate cyber encyclopedias!

There’s something warm and fuzzy about being labeled “useful,” as Jeanne Duffey calls encyclopedias, including Answers.com, in her well-written column for news-leader.com:

In print or on the Web, encyclopedias are useful

Donna Bacon, a reference librarian interviewed for the article, offers Answers.com as a good example for where to turn for reference information.

Yes, online encyclopedias are convenient, handy and useful. Bacon recommends Answers.com. “This site uses reputable sources for their encyclopedia-type entries. The reference content is derived from publishers known for their accuracy and reliability.”

Information on the site’s 4 million topics is updated frequently and it’s easy to find what you need, either via a search box or by linking to a list of 18 subjects, from Arts to Zoology. Under each topic are hundreds of subtopics. (source)

I don’t know about you, but I feel pretty damn warm and fuzzy. The truth is, it’s really wonderful to be noted like that by a reference librarian.

While WikiAnswers is most certainly a user-contributed effort, Answers.com certainly embraces the reference side of the coin with its 100′s of resources (almanac, dictionary, government, and of course – encyclopedia).

Sometimes you want straight definitions and fast facts (Answers.com), and sometimes you want advice and experience (WikiAnswers). You could say that one picks up where the other leaves off.

More of the weekly Q&A round-up.

Here’s more of the weekly round-up covering the bloggers who are uncovering truth via WikiAnswers Q&A. It never ceases to amaze me how wide the span of topics is across the site (and across the minds of bloggers).

As The Mezzanine points out, there are “wikis to find the answers to life’s burning questions.”